Indicates a link of direct discovery.

image/video

(example indicates an image found
on swiss-miss.com)

popover-sample

swiss-miss.com

text example

(example indicates a Richard Lannon quote found on brainpickings.org)

“Who knows how many scientific revolutions have been missed because their potential inaugurators disregarded the whimsical, the incidental, the inconvenient inside the laboratory?”

Richard Lannon, brainpickings.org

Indicates a link of indirect discovery, story lead, or inspiration.

image/video

(example indicates an video found
in a roundabout way through itsokaytobesmart.com)

popover-sample

itsokaytobesmart.com

text example

(example indicates a lead for a story from @eugenephoto, drawing direct information from The Guardian)

“Cambridge University has had many famous graduates, but perhaps none is more famous than Isaac Newton (class of 1665). This week, Cambridge continues to honor Newton…”

The Guardian | @eugenephoto

Example Attribution Chain

— for this quote —

…and on and on and on


The unicode character is hotlinked to the Curator's Code site to allow the ethos of attribution to spread as curious readers click the symbol to find out what it stands for. However, for use in social networks (like Twitter), simply copy and use these 'naked' unicode symbols.

Why attribute?

O
ne of the most magical things about the internet is that it's a whimsical rabbit hole of discovery – we start somewhere familiar and click our way to a wonderland of curiosity and fascination we never knew existed. What makes this contagion of semi-serendipity possible is an intricate ecosystem of "link love" – a via-chain of attribution that allows us to discover new sources through those we already know and trust.

A suggested system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, celebrating authors and creators, and also respecting those who discover and amplify their work.

While we have systems in place for literary citation, image attribution, and scientific reference, we don't yet have a system that codifies the attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy, a system that treats discovery as the creative labor that it is.

This is what The Curator's Code is – a suggested system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, celebrating authors and creators, and also respecting those who discover and amplify their work. It's an effort to make the rabbit hole open, fair, and ever-alluring. This not about policing the internet from a place of top-down authority, it's about encouraging respect and kindness among the community.

Note:  The unicode symbols ᔥ and ↬ are simply shorthand for the familiar "via" and "HT," respectively. While you may still choose to use "via" and "HT" the old-fashioned way – the goal here is to attribute ethically, regardless of how you do it – there are two reasons we are proposing the unicode characters: One, they are a cleaner, more standardized way to attribute. Two, since the characters are wrapped in a hotlink to the Curator's Code site, they serve as messengers for the ethos of the code itself, as people encounter them across the web and click to find out what they represent.

 

 

"To be realistic one
must always admit the influence of those who have gone before."
— Charles Eames
"It's not where you
take things from—it's
where you take them to."
— Jean-Luc Godard
"Nothing of me
is original. I am the combined effort of everyone I've ever known."
— Chuck Palahniuk
"Be influenced by as many great
artists as you can, but have the decency either to acknowledge the debt outright, or to try to conceal it. Don't allow 'influence' to mean merely that you mop up the particular decorative vocabulary of some one or two poets whom you happen to admire."
— Ezra Pound
Our souls as well as our bodies
are composed of individual elements which were all already present in the ranks of our ancestors. The "newness" in the individual psyche is an endlessly varied recombination of age-old components.
— Carl Jung